Gyneacologist tasks pregnant women on malaria preventive measures

  A Gynecologist, Dr Osundu Agu, on Sunday, urged pregnant women to always sleep under Long Lasting Insecticide Treated Nets in addition to keeping their surroundings and drains clean to prevent malaria infection. Osundu, who is the proprietor of a maternity hospital, gave the advice in an interview with the News Agency of Nigeria (NAN) in Enugu. He said that the presence of malaria parasites in the placenta of a pregnant woman could be life-threatening to both mother and the baby. According to him, malaria in pregnant women contribute to maternal…

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Next Ebola Outbreak ‘Inevitable’ But World Better Prepared

A new outbreak of the Ebola virus is “inevitable” but a new vaccine and rapid-response measures mean it will be more effectively contained, the head of the World Health Organization said Thursday. The Ebola crisis that began in December 2013 killed 11,300 people in Guinea, Sierra Leone and Liberia and has left thousands more survivors with long-term health problems. The WHO was criticised at the time for responding too slowly and failing to grasp the gravity of the outbreak. Speaking at an event in the Guinean capital dedicated to individuals…

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Here Are The Recommended Sleeping Hours

One research has been conducted by Charles Czeisler — a professor at Harvard University, in order to establish the exact amount of sleep that is recommended. So to get the results there were numerous studies between 2004 and 2014. And the results were obtained when they evaluated the objectives and discovered how much time is enough to rest in order not to have a negative impact on the health. According to the different stages of development, these are the recommended hours of sleep: ·         Newborn (0…

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How Marijuana Subdues Autism In Children

When Noa Shulman came home from school, her mother, Yael, sat her down to eat, then spoon-fed her mashed sweet potatoes mixed with cannabis oil. Noa, who has a severe form of autism, started to bite her own arm. “No sweetie,” Yael gently told her 17-year-old daughter. “Here, have another bite of this.” Noa is part of the first clinical trial in the world to test the benefits of medicinal marijuana for young people with autism, a potential breakthrough that would offer relief for millions of afflicted children and their…

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Fresh HIV/AIDS Breakthrough

Scientists have confirmed Human Immuno-deficiency Virus (HIV) can survive in another less-explored type of white blood cell. Until now, treatment and cure research has focused on blocking the virus from T-cells, a type of white blood cell that is key to the immune system. However, new research by the University of North Carolina (UNC), United States (U.S.), reveals the virus can also persist exclusively in macrophages, large white blood cells found in the liver, lung, bone marrow and brain. The breakthrough discovery could explain why – despite monumental advances in…

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The Science Of Addiction

Early drug usage increases a person’s odds of developing an addiction. Remember, drugs change brains and this can lead to addiction and other serious problems. So, preventing early use of drugs may go a long way in reducing these risks. If we can prevent young people from experimenting with drugs, we can prevent drug addiction. Risk of drug abuse increases greatly during times of transition. For an adult, a divorce or loss of a job may lead to drug abuse; for a teenager, risky times include moving or changing schools….

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What You Need To Know About The Tomahawk Missiles Used to By US On Syria

US President Donald Trump ordered military strikes against Syria on Thursday in retaliation for a chemical weapons attack that killed dozens of civilians, including children. Two US warships in the eastern Mediterranean launched 59 Tomahawk cruise missiles at a Syrian government airbase, US officials said. CNN’s military analysts said the Tomahawk was a good choice for this kind of attack. “This is what the Tomahawk was made for. It gets in there low level and hits these fixed facilities with no risk to an air crew,” retired US Air Force…

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Light, Reparable Bullet-Proof Armour Developed

The solidification is reversible and enables damaged armor surfaces to be repaired ‘on-the-fly’ in the field.  Scientists have developed a new transparent bullet-proof armour that is lighter in weight and can easily be repaired on the field. Thermoplastic elastomers are soft, rubbery polymers converted by physical means, rather than a chemical process, to a solid. The solidification is reversible and enables damaged armor surfaces to be repaired ‘on-the-fly’ in the field. “Heating the material above the softening point, around 100 degrees Celsius, melts the small crystallites, enabling the fracture surfaces…

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World’s Oldest Crocodile Eggs Discovered In Portugal

The world’s oldest known crocodile eggs laid some 152 million years ago have been discovered in the cliffs of Portugal. The eggs were laid by a group called crocodylomorphs, close relatives of “true” crocodiles. The remarkably well preserved eggs give an insight into the “mother croc” that laid them, researchers said. They are similar to the eggs of modern crocodiles, suggesting crocodile eggs have changed little in shape in the last 150 million years. Palaeontologists say the prehistoric crocodile ancestor would have spanned two metres, based on the size of…

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Blueberries May Improve Brain Function In Elderly

With just 12 weeks of consuming 30ml of concentrated blueberry juice every day, brain blood flow, brain activation and some aspects of working memory were improved in healthy older adults.  Drinking 30ml of concentrated blueberry juice every day may improve brain function in older people that tends to decline with age, new research says. In the study, healthy people aged 65-77 who drank concentrated blueberry juice every day showed improvements in cognitive function, blood flow to the brain and activation of the brain while carrying out cognitive tests. Evidence also…

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